Escher Girls

Float like a butterfly, Sting like a WTF!?

This is a blog to archive and showcase the prevalence of certain ways women are depicted in illustrated pop media, specifically how women are posed, drawn, distorted, and/or sexualized out of context, often in ridiculous, impossible or disturbing ways that sacrifice storytelling.

See the "About" section in the sidebar for more details.

(All art featured on this blog belongs to their respective artists)

Thoughts & Opinions from Commenters, Disqus Mods, & Submitters are their own & do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of this site.

contact: eschergirls@gmail.com

Please read submitting and commenting guidelines (sidebar) before doing either.

wincenworks:





There seemed to have been some confusion over why Greg’s drawing was so terrible - and to be fair it is terrible for so many reasons.  However two complaints that people were making were:
The thought the joke was about the breast size, and we shouldn’t make fun of people’s breast sizes
They thought the joke was about surgically enhanced breasts vs natural, and we shouldn’t make fun of people’s choice to get implants
And they are right on the points that we shouldn’t make fun of people for their breast size or whether they have chosen to get their breasts enhanced. It’s none of our business and the body in question isn’t the property of anyone but the person living in it.
However, what the artists have created here is not a woman with natural or unnatural unusually large endowments, he has drawn a woman with breasts that magically relocate and reshape so that he can fit them into the shot (presumably because he feels the effect of having a woman in the shot is diminished if we don’t have some T&A) and wrapped in a magical cloth that is normal everywhere but turns clingwrap on breasts.
The using a sphere for the shape and relocating them to the wrong portion of the torso is pretty stock standard for Greg because he relies far, far too heavily on tracing (not photo references, tracing). The overall shape is shocking because he’s mixed and matched naturally falling and flowing fabrics with space age vacuum packing clothes held in place with superglue.  Essentially he’s decided that breasts are not a part of woman’s body and realised they come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes (even wider now due to plastic surgery), he’s just tacked on a generic orb onto a bit of the body so that it’ll be “on display” regardless of how they’d actually be positioned, how clothing would sit, etc.
To further illustrate the point below is a reference pic someone provided to show how implants can dramatically alter the shape of the breast.  The model in the photo clearly treats her body as a temple so we can assume she chose the shape of the implants for her own reasons.  The draw over in red is how I would put the costume on on her in this pose, the drawover in blue is how Greg Land would have put the costume on her - skirt only partially done because I didn’t want to spend time on it.

Now the important thing to notice here is even with implants deliberately chosen to raise and separate her breasts, each individual breast still grows from the middle of each pectoral and even with her arms raised to lift them - they are still not touching her armpit or relocating to the sides to make room.
When this woman wears a shirt the fabric would rest evenly across it and create a curve plane, not a pair of spheres with the cloth wrapping around to provide definition.  It wouldn’t magically wrap around each breast and push them out further so her cloak doesn’t get in the way.
Basically I’m saying that if this character is important enough to be in the middle of the shot, she’s important enough to take the time for the artist to draw her as a real person and not just alter her body and draw part of it by a ultra-lazy shortcut.






A really thorough breakdown of that Greg Land Nightwing cover.

wincenworks:

There seemed to have been some confusion over why Greg’s drawing was so terrible - and to be fair it is terrible for so many reasons.  However two complaints that people were making were:

  • The thought the joke was about the breast size, and we shouldn’t make fun of people’s breast sizes
  • They thought the joke was about surgically enhanced breasts vs natural, and we shouldn’t make fun of people’s choice to get implants

And they are right on the points that we shouldn’t make fun of people for their breast size or whether they have chosen to get their breasts enhanced. It’s none of our business and the body in question isn’t the property of anyone but the person living in it.

However, what the artists have created here is not a woman with natural or unnatural unusually large endowments, he has drawn a woman with breasts that magically relocate and reshape so that he can fit them into the shot (presumably because he feels the effect of having a woman in the shot is diminished if we don’t have some T&A) and wrapped in a magical cloth that is normal everywhere but turns clingwrap on breasts.

The using a sphere for the shape and relocating them to the wrong portion of the torso is pretty stock standard for Greg because he relies far, far too heavily on tracing (not photo references, tracing). The overall shape is shocking because he’s mixed and matched naturally falling and flowing fabrics with space age vacuum packing clothes held in place with superglue.  Essentially he’s decided that breasts are not a part of woman’s body and realised they come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes (even wider now due to plastic surgery), he’s just tacked on a generic orb onto a bit of the body so that it’ll be “on display” regardless of how they’d actually be positioned, how clothing would sit, etc.

To further illustrate the point below is a reference pic someone provided to show how implants can dramatically alter the shape of the breast.  The model in the photo clearly treats her body as a temple so we can assume she chose the shape of the implants for her own reasons.  The draw over in red is how I would put the costume on on her in this pose, the drawover in blue is how Greg Land would have put the costume on her - skirt only partially done because I didn’t want to spend time on it.

image

Now the important thing to notice here is even with implants deliberately chosen to raise and separate her breasts, each individual breast still grows from the middle of each pectoral and even with her arms raised to lift them - they are still not touching her armpit or relocating to the sides to make room.

When this woman wears a shirt the fabric would rest evenly across it and create a curve plane, not a pair of spheres with the cloth wrapping around to provide definition.  It wouldn’t magically wrap around each breast and push them out further so her cloak doesn’t get in the way.

Basically I’m saying that if this character is important enough to be in the middle of the shot, she’s important enough to take the time for the artist to draw her as a real person and not just alter her body and draw part of it by a ultra-lazy shortcut.

A really thorough breakdown of that Greg Land Nightwing cover.

blog comments powered by Disqus
  1. ramblings-of-a-goof-off reblogged this from eschergirls
  2. librariandragon reblogged this from eschergirls
  3. callmecoco reblogged this from eschergirls
  4. elfhawk3 reblogged this from eschergirls
  5. thehalepackhouse reblogged this from catchaloststar
  6. catchaloststar reblogged this from eschergirls
  7. lordmidnight reblogged this from eschergirls
  8. mycatsarefatterthanyoucanimagine reblogged this from eschergirls
  9. darcy--reid reblogged this from neurotoxinsonline
  10. holyromanempress reblogged this from eschergirls
  11. mspyro reblogged this from eschergirls
  12. foxtail-j reblogged this from eschergirls and added:
    I just want to say that these redraws also increase how sexy these ladies are. No longer burdened with distracting...