Escher Girls

Float like a butterfly, Sting like a WTF!?

This is a blog to archive and showcase the prevalence of certain ways women are depicted in illustrated pop media, specifically how women are posed, drawn, distorted, and/or sexualized out of context, often in ridiculous, impossible or disturbing ways that sacrifice storytelling.

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(All art featured on this blog belongs to their respective artists)

Thoughts & Opinions from Commenters, Disqus Mods, & Submitters are their own & do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of this site.

contact: eschergirls@gmail.com

Please read submitting and commenting guidelines (sidebar) before doing either.


xenohound submitted:


i tried to fix this post but it was a lot harder than i expected it to be?? nothing about that pose makes sense. why is she floating. is she floating? if she’s floating why doesn’t she just turn around? why is there a butt on her thigh? who put those water balloons in her vacuum latex suit?
but yeah i apologize for the scribbliness of this fix, i got kind of frustrated

Despite the unfinished scribbliness, I do like the gist of what you were going for.  She looks very confident and bold.  Focusing on the arm attack rather than showing breasts and butt adds more of a sense of conflict to the picture.

i tried to fix this post but it was a lot harder than i expected it to be?? nothing about that pose makes sense. why is she floating. is she floating? if she’s floating why doesn’t she just turn around? why is there a butt on her thigh? who put those water balloons in her vacuum latex suit?

but yeah i apologize for the scribbliness of this fix, i got kind of frustrated

Despite the unfinished scribbliness, I do like the gist of what you were going for.  She looks very confident and bold.  Focusing on the arm attack rather than showing breasts and butt adds more of a sense of conflict to the picture.


racklestackles submitted:




Cover of The Saga of Crystar, Crystal Warrior #10 by Michael Golden

I think the woman at the front looks kinda cool, but the woman in the back is so oddly out of place to me.  It’s like an arena double booked a ballet performance with a gladiator contest, and just went with it.

Cover of The Saga of Crystar, Crystal Warrior #10 by Michael Golden

I think the woman at the front looks kinda cool, but the woman in the back is so oddly out of place to me.  It’s like an arena double booked a ballet performance with a gladiator contest, and just went with it.


waterbottleisland submitted:


Here is my quick fix for this poor gal. Hope this makes it a bit less painful to look at…

Simple and effective. 
I’d be curious to see various people’s different takes on this scene though, redrawing all 3 characters in what they think the spirit of the panel is.  Maybe that should be the next contest. o:

Here is my quick fix for this poor gal. Hope this makes it a bit less painful to look at…

Simple and effective. 

I’d be curious to see various people’s different takes on this scene though, redrawing all 3 characters in what they think the spirit of the panel is.  Maybe that should be the next contest. o:


maplepoutine submitted:






This is not really an Escher Girl, but the LoL cinematic trailer submission on this page made me think of this screencap of an FF XV trailer.  Notice how every male character have textured, realist skin while the two female characters have perfect pale skin with makeup on.

This is referring to a previous post where somebody brought up the lack of wrinkles or facial creases of any kind on a woman character in a League of Legends trailer, and I also posted a picture of the male and female faces in Batman: Arkham City as another example where female faces must be devoid of any lines (even expression lines) while male faces can have all sorts of interesting features and details, and can be exaggerated to give more character to the faces.

This isn’t just about women having to be portrayed as eternally young, or how women’s standards for beauty are so tied with having no lines on our faces, but it’s also incredibly limiting when designing and portraying female characters.  If all your female characters always have to have smooth round faces, no wrinkles, etc (and often big eyes and pouty lips too), then it’s going to be that much harder to try to make them look different than each other.  And if they also aren’t allowed to show lines on their faces for expressions, then it’s going to limit the range of their expression too, or they’re going to end up with a weird doll look when you do have them emote.  The point is, it can end up creating a very limited box for female character visuals, and creating characters that all look very similarly, even if you really don’t mean to. And that in turn limits how much information you can convey about those characters, visually.

This is not really an Escher Girl, but the LoL cinematic trailer submission on this page made me think of this screencap of an FF XV trailer.  Notice how every male character have textured, realist skin while the two female characters have perfect pale skin with makeup on.

This is referring to a previous post where somebody brought up the lack of wrinkles or facial creases of any kind on a woman character in a League of Legends trailer, and I also posted a picture of the male and female faces in Batman: Arkham City as another example where female faces must be devoid of any lines (even expression lines) while male faces can have all sorts of interesting features and details, and can be exaggerated to give more character to the faces.

This isn’t just about women having to be portrayed as eternally young, or how women’s standards for beauty are so tied with having no lines on our faces, but it’s also incredibly limiting when designing and portraying female characters.  If all your female characters always have to have smooth round faces, no wrinkles, etc (and often big eyes and pouty lips too), then it’s going to be that much harder to try to make them look different than each other.  And if they also aren’t allowed to show lines on their faces for expressions, then it’s going to limit the range of their expression too, or they’re going to end up with a weird doll look when you do have them emote.  The point is, it can end up creating a very limited box for female character visuals, and creating characters that all look very similarly, even if you really don’t mean to. And that in turn limits how much information you can convey about those characters, visually.